Local Grassroots Organization Suggests Use for Dilapidated Northern RFK Lots in the Washington Post

The Washington Post published an opinion piece by the President of the Capitol Riverside Youth Sports Park, a suggested park that would transform the dilapidated and largely ignored parking lots North of RFK Stadium into a useful green space (I, Bob Coomber, am a Board Member of this organization, and a supporter of the plan).

CRSYPdrawing

The plan was adjusted in order to accommodate suggestions from Kingman Park residents, largely on Oklahoma Avenue. It received unanimous support by ANC 7D, and the Friends of Kingman Park also wrote a letter of support.

For more information on CRYSP, go here. For a presentation that explains its relationship to a potential Olympic bid or football stadium, go here. Note that CRYSP does not support an Olympic bid or football stadium; it just wouldn’t prevent either from happening.

Friends of Kingman Park Holiday Party — Thursday, December 18 at 6:30PM at St. Benedict the Moor

Friends of Kingman Park
Community Holiday
Celebration
Thursday, December 18th, 2014
From 6:30pm-8:30pm
at St. Benedict the Moor Catholic Church
320 21st St, NE
(parking is available in the lot on 20th St, NE between C & D Streets)
There will be a 50/50 raffle and Silent Auction
* Please bring a dish to share for the Potluck! *
We will be accepting donations of non-perishable food items to distribute to community families in need

For more information and to RSVP

Please contact:

Cosby Washington
cosby.wash.fokp@gmail.com
(202) 441-3733
Bob Coomber
bob.7d01@gmail.com
(202) 689-9377

Holiday Party flyer 2014

Thank You Kingman Park – A Note from Bob Coomber

Hi Neighbors,

Thank you for coming out to vote on Tuesday! Some people told me that the only reason they came out to vote was to support me, which was truly humbling. I will work hard to maintain the trust you placed in me.

I would also like to thank our outgoing Commissioner, Lisa White, who worked so hard for our community over the past four years. Some of her major accomplishments include:

  • Gaining Ward 6 parking for the Kingman Park neighborhood;
  • Renovation of the Triangle Park at Oklahoma, 21st, and D NE;
  • Co-founder of the Friends of Kingman Park, recognized by the District Federation of Civic Associations.

Beyond these accomplishments, Lisa helped so many neighbors in small ways on a daily basis. In doing so she has fostered a renewed sense of pride and community in Kingman Park that is beyond measure. She made longstanding neighbors feel cherished, and new neighbors feel welcome. I hope to sustain that legacy.

As a first order of business as Commissioner-elect, I would like to address an issue that I heard many neighbors raise as I went door to door: education. So I would like to invite you to a meeting at St. Benedict the Moor’s Quander Room (the same room you voted in) on Saturday, December 6th at 10AM to discuss education for Kingman Park residents. Among the questions we will try to help answer: How do I choose a school? What’s the lottery all about? What are my options? We will also work to ensure that representatives from local schools attend to answer any questions.

There is a lot going on with DC’s schools. Much of it is positive; but most of it is also confusing. We have two charter schools within our boundaries: Apple Tree Oklahoma Campus; and Friendship Blow Pierce. Gibbs Elementary is on our Western Boundary, and may be reopened as a charter, Spingarn, Charles Young (soon to be a Two Rivers campus), Phelps, and Browne lie just across Benning Road, and Elliott Hine Middle School lies just across C Street to the South. The boundaries are likely to change, but Mayor-elect Bowser may not implement those changes for another year, if at all. That’s a lot to process, and I hope to facilitate a better understanding of what’s going on.

I hope to see you on Saturday December 6, or just around the neighborhood! Feel fee to email me atbob.7d01@gmail.com, or come by our home at 425 21st Street, NE.

Best,

Bob

Education Meeting for Kingman Park Residents

Education Meeting for Kingman Park Residents

Organized by Bob Coomber, ANC-Elect for 7D01 (Kingman Park)

The meeting will be held at St. Benedict the Moor’s Quander Room (the same room you can vote in, accessible on the Northeast corner of the parking lot in the 300 block of 20th Street NE) on Saturday, December 6th at 10AM.

Issues to Address:

·         New School Boundaries?

·         School Lottery?

·         DCPS vs. Charter vs. Private?

·         What Schools Are Nearby?

Attendees:

Special Guests:

·         Zaneta Graves, DCPS Director, Strategic Enrollment Initiatives, will address the various ways to access DCPS schools; including PK3/PK4, in-boundary K-12, or out-of-boundary K-12/selective high schools

·         Nicole Coomber, PhD in Education Policy and Leadership, Professor at the University of Maryland, will share a decision matrix she and I used to decide where to place our son. The decision matrix can help simplify lottery decision-making based on what’s important to you.

 

There will also be representatives from local schools including:

·         Miner Elementary

·         Maury Elemetary

·         Eliot Hine Middle School

·         Apple Tree PCS

·         Still waiting to hear from: Browne Education Campus; Two Rivers PCS; Friendship Blow Pierce PCS

RFK Redevelopment Team Chosen

Events DC, the semi-governmental entity that controls a lease over the federal Park Service land that includes RFK and its parking lots and green spaces to the North, selected a team to create a plan to redevelop the site. DC Events has assured residents that their concerns will be considered when the plan is developed. It is not clear when the plan will actually be created. The return of the Redskins seems foremost on Events DC’s mind, as well as members of the DC City Council.

Continue reading

Extreme Heat Kills Pets

Washington Humane Society Urges Public Not to Leave Dogs in Cars 

Washington, DC (June 16, 2014) – With temperatures in the high 80s and 90s right now, a heat wave can be lethal to companion animals, particularly dogs left in cars.

Each year dogs will die because they have been left in hot cars while their owners go off to do errands. The Washington Humane Society (WHS) is urging the public to be responsible and not travel with pets, unless absolutely necessary. A dog’s core body temperature is naturally higher than a human’s; they will suffer the effects of the heat much faster. Even if you don’t think it’s too hot outside – it is!

“Owners think it is OK to leave their dog in the car even if they are only running into a store for five minutes, but it’s never OK,” Scott Giacoppo, WHS VP of External Affairs states. “The public needs to be aware that dogs – or any pets – can die of heat exhaustion, and it doesn’t take long for them to become overheated.”

WHS Humane Law Enforcement Officers starting receiving calls regarding dogs left in March, and the call volume is expected to increase throughout the summer. While WHS Officers will respond to each call, this crisis can be easily avoided if pet owners took more responsible action and left pets at home, allowing Officers to dedicate their resources to the myriad of calls received each day.

WHS offers these critical travel tips to keep pets safe in the heat wave:

1.       There must be air flow in your vehicle at all times. Keeping windows cracked or leaving water out will not help if the car is not moving, and there is no air flow. Lack of air will kill animals.

2.       Dogs with pushed in faces (like Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, and Pugs) are particularly at risk. These types of dogs generally have more difficulty breathing, but all pet guardians should be on alert. Young and old dogs alike are affected differently by being in a hot car.

3.       Keep your dog at home. It doesn’t take long for your car to become an oven. Owners might think they are doing the right thing by bringing their pet with them in the car due to separation anxiety, or other factors, but this puts dogs at risk of dying.

4.       If you must travel with a pet – prepare. Before you get in, roll down the windows and put the air conditioner on to get the air circulating.

 

If you see a dog alone in car, immediately notify the Washington Humane Society Humane at (202) 576-6664 or (202) 723-5730. You can also call 911.

 

With summer season upon us, don’t let sightseeing trips or errands turn deadly. If you see a pet owner leaving their dog in the car unattended, express your concern.

 

Signs of over-heating in animals include loud, rapid panting, rapid pulse, glazed eyes, excessive salivation, elevated body temperature, excessive whining or agitation, staring, vomiting and white or bluish gums. Pets can be cooled immediately by placing them in the shade and sponging them with cool water, especially on the head, feet and groin area. If you believe your pet is suffering from heat exhaustion, contact your veterinarian immediately—it could save your pet’s life.

 

Library Bike Tour

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May is National Bike Month and DC Public Libraries are gearing up with bike tours, events, bike-themed storytimes, and reading suggestions.  

 

A brief roundup of events is below – for more information, links to bike organizations in DC, and good book ideas for bikers and book lovers, check out the DC Public Library website at http://dclibrary.org/bike or check at your local branch.   All events and tours are FREE.

 
TWO Bike Tours to DC Libraries

**Saturday, May 17th – 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. – DC Public Library’s 5th annual Tour de DCPL
 
This year DCPL is proud to announce its official partnership with Black Women Bike, as well as DDOT’s Anacostia Waterfront Initiative for the 5th Annual Tour de DCPL.  The ride is a bit more challenging then in past years…about 14 miiles…children 9 and under are encouraged to attend the “Library Lovers Like to Bike” family ride on May 31st (See below).
 
Check in starts at 9 a.m. at Southeast Library (403 7th Street SE) and the ride starts at 9:30 a.m.  The first leg is a quick ride up 7th Street to Northeast Library (330 7th Street NE).  Then a nice ride to Roosedale Library (1701 Gales Street NE), then on to Deanwood (1350 49th Street NE), followed by Dorothy Height/Benning Library (3935 Benning Road SE), Anacostia Library (1800 Good Hope Road SE) and over the 11th Street bridge and  back to Southeast Library.   
 
REGISTER for the Tour de DCPL at:  https://tourdedcplv.eventbrite.com
 
 
**Saturday, May 31st from 9:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. – “Library Lovers Like to Bike Kids Tour”
 
Families with children ages 9 and younger can celebrate National Bike Month with your neighbors and librarians from all Ward 6 DCPL branches -Northeast, Rosedale, Southeast, Southwest and Northwest One.  The event will be held rain or shine, so bring your raingear!
 
For those meeting at Rosedale Library (1701 Gales Street NE) or Southeast (403 7th Street SE) we’ll have bike safety tips from biking police officers and library staff starting at 9:45 a.m. Then we’ll ride on over to Northeast Branch (330 7th Street NE) for story-time, bike decorating, repair demos, snacks and more.  
 
Adult chaperones and helmets are required for all child bikers. All adults will be required to sign liability waivers at for themselves and their children before starting the ride.  
 
For more information visit:  http://dclibrary.org/node/41195 or or email Ms. Tammeric at Rosedale LIbrary at tammeric.scurry@dc.gov.  
 
 
“Reading ‘n Riding” Events at Your Neighborhood Library
 
Rosedale Library (1701 Gales Street NE):  Morning Glory Stories (Especially for Babies and Toddlers) held every Monday at 10 a.m. will feature bike-themed stories this month.
 
Anacostia Library will host free bike clinics this month starting May 10th from 12 noon to 2:30 p.m., courtesy of the Bike House store.
 
Dorothy Height/Benning Library “Can You Ride a Bike?” Preschool Storytime on Wednesday, May 14th at 10:15 a.m.

 
Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library – The Digital Commons will feature 3-D Printing for Bikes onThursday, May 15th at 7 p.m.
 
Petworth Neighborhood Library will host a Panel Discussion on “Biking and Community Change in the District” on Thursday, May 22nd at 7 p.m.